Summer Sun

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It can be a lot of fun to play in the sun, and sunlight is important for our overall health. However, the suns ultra violate rays can cause sun burns and serious health problems. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends covering up and staying in the shade, especially between 10am and 4pm when the suns rays are the strongest. A good sunscreen is also recommended.

Infants and babies should be kept covered up and in the shade, but a minimal amount of sunscreen of at least 15 SPF can be used.

Read more on the American Academy of Pediatrics website.

Handwashing

How many times have you and your children washed your hands today?

In any group setting like school or daycare, the single most effective way to reduce risk of sickness and infection is hand hygiene. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “adherence to good hand-hygiene techniques has consistently demonstrated a reduction in disease transmission.”

All day your children are constantly exposed to bacteria and viruses. While hand washing is the single most effective prevention method, studies show that most people do not have good hand washing skills.

Proper Hand Washing Steps:

Wet hands

Apply soap

Rub hands vigorously together making sure to cover all surface area

Scrub together 10 – 15 seconds

Rinse completely

Dry

According to the Centers for Disease Control, studies have shown that antibacterial soaps are no better at washing away germs than regular soap, and that antibacterial soaps can even wash away good bacteria, increasing the chances of getting sick. The CDC suggests using warm water and a clean bar of regular soap on your child’s hands.

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Summer Sun Care for Babies and Children

Protect Children from too Much Sun

Wear hats, sunglasses, and protective clothing.
Use sunscreen with SPF 15+ on kids over six months; keep infants out of direct sunlight.
Limit time in the mid-day sun – the sun is most intense between 10 and 4.

(More environmental tips for children)

Sun Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics

Babies under 6 months:

  • The two main recommendations from the AAP to prevent sunburn are to avoid sun exposure, and to dress infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn. However, when adequate clothing and shade are not available, parents can apply a minimal amount of sunscreen with at least 15 SPF (sun protection factor) to small areas, such as the infant’s face and the back of the hands. If an infant gets sunburn, apply cool compresses to the affected area.

For All Other Children:

  • The first, and best, line of defense against harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is covering up. Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak intensity hours – between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Wear a hat with a three-inch brim or a bill facing forward, sunglasses (look for sunglasses that provide 97% -100% protection against both UVA and UVB rays), and clothing with a tight weave.
  • On both sunny and cloudy days use a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or greater that protects against UVA and UVB rays.
  • Be sure to apply enough sunscreen — about one ounce per sitting for a young adult.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
  • Use extra caution near water and sand (and even snow!) as they reflect UV rays and may result in sunburn more quickly.

– See more at: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/Sun-and-Water-Safety-Tips.aspx#sthash.nYkz91JC.dpuf

 

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